In this comic I explore what speech bubbles would do in between scenes.
Would they hang out together and talk?

word balloons comic

Read it here, or click on the image above.

It was a fun (and a bit silly) experiment.
I think speech bubbles (or word balloons) are an intriguing part of comics that are usually taken for granted.
So this comic is also a way to put them in the spotlight a little.

TURTLES ALL THE WAY DOWN

Also this reminds me of the philosophical question about turtles.
Turtles?
In a famous anecdote (sometimes ascribed to Bertrand Russel) a scientist explains to a woman how the earth is round and not the center of the universe and all that.
The woman is not one bit convinced, stating the world rests on the back of a giant turtle.
When the scientist askes “but what then, supports the turtle?”, the woman replies “another turtle”.
The scientist knows a good argument when he hears it, so continues “but what supports that turtle then?”
“Don’t get yourself worked up mister, it’s turtles all the way down!”

Please read more on this expression of infinite regress (I’ve got that from Wikipedia) here.

I think this translates quite well to speech bubbles.
How do they talk?
Why, by using speech bubbles of course!
Okay, but how do those speech bubbles talk then?
Don’t worry, it’s speech bubbles all the way up!

ON THE ORIGIN OF SPEECH BUBBLES

For this comic I decided not to make a specific bonus page (like I did for my last comic, Abandon), but instead provide you with some background.
In The Art of the Word Balloon (part I – III) I explain how word balloons transformed from a desperation device into an integral part of comic storytelling.
Check out part I right here.

WHAT DID YOU THINK?

So, did you ever consider word balloons talking to each other?
Or is this way too silly?
Please let me know in the comments section below.

2 Replies to “bubbles”

  1. I absolutely love it! It’s funny but it makes you think about more than just speech balloons: what with sound effects? The bubbles are like stage actors: getting in character, learning their text and having doubts about the text…
    Does this also apply to movie and theater?

    Another great work by Haes!

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